Charlene Cobb

ccobb@naropa.edu

Adjunct Faculty

Programs

MA in Contemplative Education - Adjunct Faculty

Education

EdD National-Louis University
MS Ed. Northern Illinois University
BA University of Illinois-Chicago

Charlene Cobb has worked in education for over 25 years as a teacher, reading specialist, district administrator, professor, and consultant. The focus of her work is supporting the alignment of curriculum, instruction, and assessment to meet the needs of all learners. Charlene has worked nationally with schools and districts to support instructional programs and is particularly interested in the development of linguistically diverse learners and struggling readers. She has contributed several articles to the International Reading Association journal, The Reading Teacher, and has co-authored two books and written chapters on the topics of literacy, vocabulary, and assessment.

Charlene has a strong commitment to equity for all learners and believes that honoring and empowering learners is critical to achieving equity. She finds fulfillment in working with all stakeholders, including students, staff, parents, and school communities.

Quote

I am excited to be part of elementary education program. Educational practice is finally coming to recognize the research and realize the value of social-emotional learning. I firmly believe that Naropa's students will be well-prepared as contemplative educators to serve as highly effective educators for all students.

Recent publications

Cobb, C. (2017). "Enriched Vocabulary Instruction Within a Balanced Literacy Framework." In K. Soll (Ed.), Comprehensive Literacy Basics (pp. 57-73). North Mankato, MN. Maupin House Publishing, Inc. by Capstone Professional.

Cobb, C. & Blachowicz,C. (2014). No more “Look up the List” Vocabulary Instruction. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.

Courses taught

EDU 220 Theories, Strategies, and Assessment for CLD Students K-12
EDU 345 Elementary Literacy 1: Foundations of Reading

What book do you find yourself regularly pressing into the hands of students?

Words matter and words spoken by teachers to students have significant and lasting impact. I choose two books by Peter Johnston, Choice Words: How Our Language Affects Children's Learning and Opening Minds: Using Language to Change Lives.

What's next?

I hope to continue my understanding of mindfulness for myself and to share my learning with my students. I plan to continue my writing projects and present on elementary literacy at state and national conferences.

 


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