<iframe src="//www.googletagmanager.com/ns.html?id=GTM-NP2ZK8" height="0" width="0" style="display:none;visibility:hidden"></iframe> Past CACE Events

Past CACE Events

Past Events

 

Teaching and Learning for Wholeness and Social Change

Laura I Rendón, Professor Emerita

rendon
March 17-19, 2017

Friday Evening Talk:

Toward A Sentipensante (Sensing/Thinking) Pedagogic Imaginary: Deep Learning Experiences Focused on Wholeness and Social Justice

How do we create an education that is purposeful and meaningful at a deep level and able to assist students to become impactful social change agents as they meet an increasingly complex world? This public talk will introduce a “sentipensante (sensing/thinking) pedagogy” that emphasizes wholeness, contemplative engagement and social justice. Participants will be guided in the development of deep, culturally-validating experiences for diverse learners.

Weekend program:

Contemplative Engagement: Teaching and Learning for Wholeness and Social Change

This 1.5 day interactive workshop for K-12 and post-secondary educators will focus on addressing two key questions:

  • How can educators engage learners in a deep learning experience designed to activate and energize both intellectual capacities and inner life development (for example: sense of purpose, deep self knowledge, sense of compassion, social and emotional growth, sense of community, justice and fairness, among others)?
  • How can educators connect contemplative education to social justice issues in their teaching and learning endeavors?

The culmination of this workshop will be a participant-designed teaching and learning project which includes diverse contemplative tools.

Laura I. Rendón's Keynote Address, Naropa University, 2015:

Read Keynote

Body, Speech, Mind Practice: Entering Another's World

A Colloquium with Karen Kissel Wegela, PhD Professor, Contemplative Psychotherapy & Buddhist Psychology    

Date: Tuesday, February 28, 4-6pm
Location: Nalanda 9235, Nalanda Campus
Cost: Free

In Contemplative Psychotherapy, therapists use the "Body, Speech, Mind" practice as a way to feel into what a client experiences.  Unlike some other consultation and supervision approaches, Body Speech, Mind does not seek answers to problems, but instead seeks to understand more deeply what it is like to be someone else.  It is a useful mindfulness awareness practice for anyone who wants to better understand another: a student, a family member, a colleague, or anyone at all.

Naropa University welcomes participants with disabilities.  Persons with questions about accessibility or who require disability accommodations should contact Charlotte Rotterdam at crotterdam@naropa.edu.

 

JO HA KYU/Beginning Middle End: Tools for the Contemplative Classroom

With: Lee Worley, Professor, Contemplative Education & Carla Mueller, MDiv Alumna
 
Monday, November 28, 2016 4:30-6:00 p.m. Virya, Paramita Campus
Naropa University, Boulder, Colorado

Jo Ha Kyu is an ancient concept of modulation and movement applied in a wide variety of traditional Japanese arts, and is translated as beginning, middle and, end. The roots of this offer an alternative paradigm to our western approach to time and transition. According to contemplative educator Richard Brown, Jo Ha Kyu can be used as a frame for simple pedagogical tools: in class for instructors, and as integrative and embodiment guidelines for both teachers and students. Fundamnetally, it is a transitional device that can benefit all manner of change.

In this workshop we will explore the foundation of the practice both historically and experientially and examine what Jo Ha Kyu offers our contemplative culture at Naropa University and Beyond. 

Naropa University welcomes participants with disabilities. Persons with questions about accessibility or who require disability accommodations should contact Charlotte Rotterdam at crotterdam@naropa.edu.

Visiting Scholar Dr. Al Kaszniak at Naropa 

February 15-March 16, 2016

CACE is honored to host Dr. Kaszniak for a month-long visit to Naropa University, during which he will be working closely with Naropa faculty on a variety of projects, including developing research and training for Naropa’s Compassion Initiative. Dr. Kaszniak will offer two public programs:

  • The Frederick P Lenz Lecture on “Zen and the Brain: Contemplative Practices for a Multi-tasking World’
    Thursday, February 18, 7:00 p.m. / Nalanda Events Center
  • Opening the Heart: The Psychology of Empathy & Compassion weekend retreat // March 4-6 
    Friday, March 4: 7:00-9:00 p.m.
    Saturday, March 5,  & Sunday, March 6: 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Al Kaszniak, PhD, is an emeritus professor at the University of Arizona (UA). He previously served as Director of the Neuropsychology, Emotion, and Meditation Laboratory; Faculty and Advisory Board member of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute; and professor in the departments of Psychology, Neurology, and Psychiatry at The UA. His work has focused on the neuropsychology of Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurological disorders, consciousness, memory self-monitoring, emotion, and the psychophysiology of long-term and short-term meditation. He has served as Chief Academic Officer and interim CEO for the Mind and Life Institute. A lineage holder and teacher (Sensei) in the Soto tradition of Zen Buddhism, he serves as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Upaya Zen Center where he teaches, among other things, Zen Brain retreats and the annual Being with Dying training for clinicians who provide end-of-life care.

Buddhism, Contemplative Practice and Social Justice

With Jan Willis

Sunday, October 9; 6:30-8:00 p.m.

What insights can ancient Buddhist teachings offer to the challenges of racism, inequity and other issues of social justice we face today? How can contemplative practice extend beyond the meditation cushion into activism in our daily lives?

Join us for an evening talk and discussion with renowned scholar and practitioner Jan Willis as she draws from her personal experience and decades of teaching to explore these questions.

Jan Willis, PhD, is Professor Emerita of Religion at Wesleyan University and Visiting Professor of Religious Studies at Agnes Scott College.  She has studied with Tibetan Buddhists in India, Nepal, Switzerland and the U.S. for almost five decades, and has taught courses in Buddhism for over forty years.  The author of Dreaming Me: Black, Baptist, and Buddhist—One Woman’s Spiritual Journey, among many other books, she writes regularly on various topics in Buddhism including meditation, hagiography, women, and race.  TIME magazine named Willis one of six “spiritual innovators for the new millennium” and Ebony magazine named Willis one of its “Power 150” most influential African Americans.

Mindfulness, MOOCs & Money in Higher Education: Contemplative Possibilities and Promise

March 18–21, 2016
Boulder, CO
Learn more

Opening the Heart: The Psychology of Empathy & Compassion weekend retreat with Dr. Al Kaszniak

March 4–6

This weekend course will examine empathy and compassion from the perspectives of both contemplative traditions/practices and recent empirical research in social neuroscience, cognitive neuroscience, affective science, and social/cultural psychology. The course will involve relevant contemplative practices (e.g., breath-focused mindful attention, mindful dyadic listening, lovingkindness meditation). 

The Frederick P Lenz Lecture: “Zen and the Brain: Contemplative Practices for a Multi-tasking World’ with Dr. Al Kaszniak

Zen and the BrainThursday, February 18 // 7:00 p.m.
Nalanda Events Center // 6287 Arapahoe Ave.

We live in an increasingly multitasking world, often resulting in distress and a sense that our attention is almost constantly fragmented. Do contemplative practices have a role to play in how we manage multitasking demands at work and home? This lecture will review research on the brain correlates and consequences of multitasking, and on how practices such as meditation impact multitasking. Research examples will include the presenter’s own studies and those of others, with perspectives on this research drawn from a lifetime of Zen practice.

Town Hall: “Can Compassion Be Trained?: A Neuroscientist’s Perspective” with Dr. Al Kaszniak

Wednesday, February 17 // 12:00–1:20 p.m.
Performing Arts Center // 2130 Arapahoe Ave.
Free

Join us for this special Town Hall with Visiting CACE Scholar Dr. Al Kaszniak as he offers reflections on the growing fields of compassion research and training, drawing on his extensive and unique background as a neuroscientist and Zen practitioner and teacher. There will be ample time for questions and conversation.

Al Kaszniak, PhD, is an emeritus professor at the University of Arizona (UA). He previously served as Director of the Neuropsychology, Emotion, and Meditation Laboratory; Faculty and Advisory Board member of the Evelyn F. McKnight Brain Institute; and professor in the departments of Psychology, Neurology, and Psychiatry at UA. His work has focused on the neuropsychology of Alzheimer’s disease and other age-related neurological disorders, consciousness, memory self-monitoring, emotion, and the psychophysiology of long-term and short-term meditation. He has served as Chief Academic Officer and interim CEO for the Mind & Life Institute. A lineage holder and teacher (Sensei) in the Soto tradition of Zen Buddhism, he serves as the Chairman of the Board of Directors of Upaya Zen Center where he teaches, among other things, Zen Brain retreats and the annual Being with Dying training for clinicians who provide end-of-life care.

On the Spot: The Warriors' Exam

December 2, 2015

A Panel Discussion with Naropa faculty Dale AsraelLama Tenpa Gyaltsen, and Judith Simmer-Brown

One of the most renowned “heritage practices” at Naropa University is the Warriors’ Exam, a form of dyadic inquiry that serves as an oral midterm or final exam in many of our classrooms.  This interactive Town Hall explores the origins and dynamics of the Warriors’ Exam, adapted from traditional forms of Buddhist debate especially for the university. We will discuss various styles of the practice, “basic goodness” grading rubrics, and fundamental principles.  This event is designed to help faculty give an authentic exam, and support students to take one.

Discipline with Delight: Rigor in Contemplative Education

October 27, 2015
A panel discussion with Naropa faculty: Richard BrownKathleen Gregory, and Bhanu Kapil // Moderator: Charlotte Rotterdam

Over the last forty-plus years, contemplative educators have developed a variety of pedagogies that weave together personal inquiry with academic discipline and social transformation. Within this innovative educational framework, how do we maintain rigor as we engage in contemplative practice and at a deeply personal level of a student’s experience? How do we guide students in the integration of their personal experience (first-person inquiry) into contemplative coursework in ways that are relevant, valuable, and rigorous? Drawing on their respective disciplines and teaching experience, three Naropa faculty will explore these and related questions through dialogue, group discussion and some shared practice. 

Cutting-edge Trends in Contemplative Education: Leading Conversations

September 18, 2015

The field of Contemplative Education and Studies has burgeoned over the last decade, infusing lower and higher education across the US and abroad. Educators and institutions of learning are showing increasing interest in and a commitment to developing practices and pedagogies that support the growth of the whole person, and to integrating mindfulness, compassion, and other contemplative practices into the heart of the educational experience. Join seven contemplative leaders and educators from nationally recognized institutions for an evocative and engaging conversation on issues, challenges, and the future of this movement.

Panelists are CACE Advisory Board members: 
Thomas Coburn (Brown University), Carolyn Jacobs (Mind & Life Institute), Tish Jennings (University of Virginia), Al Kaszniak (University of Arizona), David Rome (Focusing, formerly with Garrison Institute), and Pamela Seigle (Center for Courage and Renewal). Moderated by Judith Simmer-Brown.